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Regional Parks in Reno and Lake Tahoe

Tahoe Rim Trail vistaDavis CreekGalena Creek ParkSugar Pine Point bear

Reno Tahoe Parks

Davis Creek Regional Park

West side of Washoe Valley
US 395 South (20 miles south of Reno)
Ranger/Camping: 775-849-0684; Picnics: 775-785-4319

Picnic facilities are available by reservation. An equestrian trailhead provides access to the Toiyabe National Forest. This campground/day use area offers outstanding views of Washoe Lake and Slide Mountain. Individual picnic sites surround a small scenic pond upon which non-motorized boats are allowed. During the coldest months of winter, the pond freezes and makes a great ice skating area, which is free to the public. Nature trails are marked for a self-guided hike among the native flora and fauna. Group hikes may be arranged to explore the surrounding Davis Creek environs by calling the Ranger. Although there are no hook-ups, longer travel trailers can be accommodated at 19 sites. Hot showers are available year-round. Group camping and picnic facilities are available by reservation.

Galena Creek Park

18350 Mt. Rose Highway
Park Ranger: 775-849-2511

This park is popular year-round. In the summer, enjoy hiking in the Sierra along Galena, Jones and White's Creeks; in the winter, visit the park for sledding and cross-country skiing. Nestled in a forested area on the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada, Galena Creek Park is seven miles up the Mt. Rose Highway from the intersection with U.S. 395. Galena Creek flows through the park creating separate north and south portions of the park. Campfire programs, ranger-led hikes, and exhibits in the old stone visitor's center add to the diversity of the park.

Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park

2005 SR 28, Incline Village, NV
775-831-0494

Skirting the eastern shore of Lake Tahoe, this 13,400-acre park offers a wealth of recreational opportunities, wildlife and many other attractions. A major attraction for park visitors is the famous Flume Trail, where mountain bikers and hikers can traverse the narrow path of the Comstock-era water flume, which is perched 1,600 feet above Lake Tahoe. Once on the Flume, visitors experience breathtaking views of Lake Tahoe. At lake level, Sand Harbor offers pristine waters, beautiful white beaches, boat launching and an abundance of picnic areas for visitor enjoyment. The Tahoe Rim Trail passes through the park for 14 miles, providing a five-mile loop connection with the Flume Trail for cyclists and hikers. Tahoe and several other lakes provide fishing, swimming and boating attractions. Spooner Lake contains trailheads for backcountry biking, hiking, backpacking or horseback expeditions. Cave Rock, another park attraction, has boat launches and water perfect for fishing. Cross-country skiing is available at Spooner Lake.

Sugar Pine Point State Park

Sugar Pine Point is a forested promontory on the western side of Lake Tahoe. The park includes a mile and three quarters of lake frontage with a number of sandy beaches and a unique natural area where the untouched, primeval forest of the Tahoe Basin marches right down to the water's edge. The developed area south of General Creek features a number of historic buildings including a hand-hewn, 19th century log cabin and an elegant turn-of-the-century summer home known as the Ehrman Mansion. The park extends some three-and-one-half miles west into the General Creek watershed, a natural entryway into the 62,469-acre Desolation Wilderness Area. Clearly marked trails (suitable for summer use) wind up the gentle, forest-filled valley formed by General Creek and provide easy access to the wilderness beyond.

Tahoe Rim Trail

Come hike, bike, and horseback ride on the spectacular Tahoe Rim Trail as it follows the ridges and mountain tops that circle Lake Tahoe. Extending 150 miles through national forest, wilderness and state park land, the trail crosses forests and meadows and skirts the shores of crystalline lakes. At elevations between 6,300 and 10,353 feet, the Tahoe Rim Trail is an experience in clear blue sky, clean air and solitude. It follows the ridge tops to provide outstanding views of the lake and mountains. Spur trails lead to splendid overlooks. The Watson Lake loop of the trail, popular with picnickers, campers and anglers, starts at the Brockway Summit Trailhead off Highway 267. With all but nine miles complete, the trail is open to hikers and equestrians. Mountain bikers are welcome on the entire trail. The trail passes through six counties in two states, through U.S. Forest Service lands, including the Desolation Wilderness, and through Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park. It follows a portion of the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail.

Camping is generally allowed along the trail. However, permits are required in wilderness areas and camping in the Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park is at designated campsites only. Although the trail is technically open year-round, winter weather is extreme and activity is usually limited to day treks on snowshoes.
 

For a list of city parks click on the links below:

City of Reno Parks and Recreation

City of Sparks Parks and Recreation

Washoe County Parks and Recreation

For more information on regional parks click on the links below:

D.L. Bliss State Park

Donner Memorial State Park

Emerald Bay State Park

Grover Hot Springs State Park

Washoe Lake State Park

 

Park Information

Nevada State Parks

Sand Harbor, P.O. Drawer D, Incline, NV 894532
775-831-0494

Desolation Wilderness

870 Emerald Bay Road, South Lake Tahoe, CA 96150-2674
530-573-2600

Eldorado National Forest

Information Center, 3070 Camino Heights Drive, Camino, CA 95709
530-644-6048, 530-644-3034 (fax)

Lake Tahoe Basin Mgt. Unit

870 Emerald Bay Road, South Lake Tahoe, CA 96150
530-573-2600

Stanislaus National Forest

19777 Greenley Road, Sonora, CA 95370
209-532-3671

Tahoe National Forest

10342 Hwy. 89 North, Truckee, CA 96161
530-587-3558

Tahoe National Forest

530-587-2158 (24 hour recording)

Toiyabe National Forest

Carson Ranger District, 1536 South Carson Street, Carson City, NV 89701
775-882-2766